The Campaign to End Obesity


 
Today, two-thirds of U.S. adults and nearly one in three children struggle because they are overweight or have obesity. The effects of the nation’s obesity epidemic are immense: taxpayers, businesses, communities and individuals spend hundreds of billions of dollars each year due to obesity, including nearly $200 billion in medical costs. Obesity is the reason that the current generation of youth is predicted to live a shorter life than their parents. 

Much can be done to reverse the epidemic, yet important opportunities to tackle obesity at the national policy level -- including changes that enable more Americans to eat healthy and be active, as well as those that provide appropriate medical treatment for patients -- have gone largely unmet. The Campaign works to fill this gap. By bringing together leaders from across industry, academia and public health with policymakers and their advisors, the Campaign provides the information and guidance that decision-makers need to make policy changes that will reverse one of the nation’s costliest and most prevalent diseases.

  


The Campaign to End Obesity
More than 100 Members of Congress Ask for Passage of the Treat and Reduce Obesity Act of 2015 During Medicare's 50th Anniversary Celebration
07.30.15, PR Newswire
TAMPA, Fla., July 30, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- The Treat and Reduce Obesity Act (TROA) of 2015 (HR 2404 and S 1509) continues to gain momentum with 101 members of the House of Representatives and 10 members of the Senate co-sponsoring this important legislation. The Act, originally introduced by Representatives Paulsen (R-MN); and Kind (D-WI); and Senators Carper (D-DE) and Cassidy (R-LA), aims to provide Medicare beneficiaries with additional treatment tools to help individuals address their overweight and obesity.
CDC: 1 in 9 children have high blood pressure
The Hill, 07.29.15
Public health and science groups are working to debunk the reason why GOP members and special interest say target sodium levels in school lunches should stay where they are. As part of the first ladyís prized healthy school lunch nutrition standards in the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act, schools were required in the 2014-2015 school year to reduce sodium levels in high school lunches to 1,420 milligrams over the course of a week. By July 2017, the law requires schools further reduce those levels to 1,000 mg in high school lunches.
FDA OKs Nonsurgical Device for Treating Obesity
The Wall Street Journal, 07.28.15
The Food and Drug Administration approved a nonsurgical device for treating obesity that includes two connected silicone balloons filled with salt water that are placed in a patientís stomach.
Study: School lunches now healthier at racially diverse schools
The Hill, 07.27.15
First Lady Michelle Obamaís prized healthy school lunch standards have given students at smaller and racially diverse schools access to healthier lunches, a new study from a heath and health care advocacy group found. The study, commissioned by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, found that during the 2010-2011 school year, the odds of having both fruits and vegetables, as well as whole grains, available everyday was 2.4 and 2.3 times higher, respectively, for students in predominantly white middle schools than for students in more diverse schools.
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New Release: The New Markets Tax Credit: Opportunities for Investment
in Healthy Foods and Physical Activity



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CBO Scoring Misses Billions of Dollars in Potential Long-Term Savings from Effective Obesity Prevention Policies


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To learn more about changes in federal policy that will enable more Americans to eat healthy and be active, as well as those that provide appropriate medical treatment for patients, visit the Campaign to End Obesity Action Fund's website by clicking here.  




* In 2010, the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office reported that nearly 20 percent of the increase in U.S. health care spending (from 1987‐2007) was caused by obesity.

* The annual health costs related to obesity in the U.S. are nearly $200 billion, and nearly 21 percent of U.S. medical costs can be attributed on obesity, according to research released by the National Bureau of Economic Research.


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